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January 22, 2009

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Nice post! And Larry's question (i.e. why is simple often NOT easy to do?') set me thinking. The cause IMO is our irrational mind:

A lot of advice is abstract ("spend less"), which is already a handicap. The translation into something practical ("stop buying lattes") is left to our mind. Our flawed mind. For instance, when told to spend less, one of the first translations we may think of is forgoing lattes. A highly unpleasant idea; one that can't be true! Our mind aborts its search for other viable ways to save (1st flaw), and now tries to disqualify the no-latte idea ("I know rich people who drink LOTS of lattes!")(2nd flaw). This is hard-wired and happens so fast we don't even realize. We ditch the ridiculous no-latte idea and the ridiculous advice to spend less, and go buy a lottery ticket and a latte. As usual. :-)

What you'll want to do when giving financial advice, is to give varied, concrete examples, to set the other person thinking and free his mind from running in loops. The really good blogs, like this one, have inspiring posts.

...have inspiring posts, that do exactly that.

Sometimes spending less isn't an option.

I'm trapped in an overpriced housing situation I can't resolve on my current income, and I can't find any way to increase my income in this economy.

I was just reading elsewhere that the path to true wealth isn't with spending money but saving money. Being thrifty is the best and surest way to a happier and wealthier future.

It's true, the things that are worth doing aren't easy, but they're usually simple. I easily get bored with simple things. That's why I read motivational blogs like this one. ;)

Re: I was just reading elsewhere that the path to true wealth isn't with spending money but saving money. Being thrifty is the best and surest way to a happier and wealthier future.


Frugality can't be the answer; I live on $950 per month and I'm perpetually broke.

I think Larry hits the concept dead on. It's so much "easier" to be lazy and take zero action in one's life because then they aren't responsible for failing. If you make it super simple than they've got no where to go. I am working with a team on this exact thing, take action if you want to change something in your life that's not working whether it's money, relationship, health, fitness, etc. I believe the victim era is over and people are ready to take responsibility and action for themselves and when they succeed they will be proud of the action they took.

Maybe, it's easy to learn, but difficult to master?

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