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January 26, 2006

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Ugh. Yeah, I have a very similiar experience with my wife and daughter. My daughter is only 2.5 years old and has had far more access to the camera than I would EVER like. So, our $300 camera died. There are so many chunks out if from being dropped, it's no mystery how it happened. My tip would be "Go cheap" if you have little kids.

We just bought a 4.1 megapixel Sony for $77 by watching http://www.fatwallet.com for a good deal. (Bought it at Officemax). So, anyway, I'm very pleased. And I'm not too emotionally attached to this one so when it breaks, I'll only swear a little.
Hazzard

BUT... If you can get your hands on an inexpensive digital camera, they make great gifts for kids. My eight year old son uses our old Nikon CoolPix 800 (a 2MP dinosaur that had very little value remaining when we got out new camera). We actually let him start using it when he was seven. It's really fascinating to see what he takes pictures of -- it sort of lets us see the world through his eyes.

How about when your brand new Nikon Coolpix 4100 takes a spin through the washing machine? I can't fault any children- it's totally on me. It was in my laundry basket (!!) and I dumped the laundry in the washer in a hurry. The camera was totally busted, but the SD card still works. I saved for a few months and upgraded to a 5100.

I guess you don't want to hear that it's only money.

Try the "keep the camera hanging from your neck" rule.

Over thirty years ago my husband took a fantastic camera on a trip and dropped it over a waterfall. It was the best one we ever had and was a gift.

I guess you don't want to hear that it's only money.

Try the "keep the camera hanging from your neck" rule.

Over thirty years ago my husband took a fantastic camera on a trip and dropped it over a waterfall. It was the best one we ever had and was a gift.

I guess you don't want to hear that it's only money.

Try the "keep the camera hanging from your neck" rule.

Over thirty years ago my husband took a fantastic camera on a trip and dropped it over a waterfall. It was the best one we ever had and was a gift.

You're the parent. You've got to set some rules: Always keep the camera leash on your wrist or around your neck when taking pictures, Don't use the camera with dirty or wet hands, No rough housing allowed with/near the camera, When you're done taking the picture, the camera goes back into a padded camera bag and mommy or daddy is ALWAYS the one in charge of the bag, No taking the camera without mommy or daddy's permission/supervision, Anyone who can't pass a t/f, multiple choice test on the user's manual with a score of 80% isn't allowed to use the camera. Anyone who doesn't follow the rules isn't allowed to use the camera until they are 14.

Funny. My four-year old has been taking pictures with out digital cameras for over a year now: no drops, no damage, no food in odd places. He still doesn't hold the camera quite steady enough, but his ideas about what's worth taking pictures of sometimes yields great results. It's not age; it's behavior.

Yeah, tell me about it. Our family bought digital cameras for all the kids at Christmas. We go them the HP 200 dollar models. Christmas was great and we all had a good time snapping pictures of everything in sight.

I even made a powerpoint show with the Xmas pictures and did it all to the song, Wonderful World (Louis Armstrong) 1 year later ALL of those cameras are broken. Just goes to show HP can make some garbage products to.

If you want to save money in the long run. By quality first and be careful with it!

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